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Yes Yes, please. No No: A Documentary is the story of Dock Ellis, who famously pitched a no-hitter for the Pirates while high on LSD. This is a brief window into the world of 1970s baseball that Dan Epstein describes in his book Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging ’70s

Another interesting documentary regarding that era is The Battered Bastards of Baseball, about a ragtag indie Portland minor league team that became a real life ‘Bad News Bears’ story as they took on the Major League Baseball establishment. 

Battered Bastards is currently streaming on Netflix. No No opened yesterday and is playing in NYC at the Village East Cinemas. The film features original music by Beastie Boy Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz. 

Visit the official No No documentary site for screening locations nationwide.

Filed under ad rock baseball mlb dock ellis no hitter 1970s film movies documentaries

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Co-opting Protest as Pop Art
"Scabby The Rat" has been used for 25 years to protest companies that use non-union labor at construction sites and businesses.  The appearance of the towering inflatable eyesore was supposed to be a burr under contractors’ saddles, embarrassing them in the public eye.
The folks at Lever House on Park Avenue have completely co-opted the imagery of “Scabby”, however, by turning him into a piece of kitschy pop art in the plaza next to the upscale restaurant Casa Lever. Now bankers can enjoy his presence as they sip $20 cocktails at Casa Lever’s bar. No longer a source of embarrassment; Scabby is a mounted trophy.
The piece crafted at Polich Tallix has been on display at Lever House since 2012, but I don’t walk that side of Park Avenue very frequently.

Co-opting Protest as Pop Art

"Scabby The Rat" has been used for 25 years to protest companies that use non-union labor at construction sites and businesses.  The appearance of the towering inflatable eyesore was supposed to be a burr under contractors’ saddles, embarrassing them in the public eye.

The folks at Lever House on Park Avenue have completely co-opted the imagery of “Scabby”, however, by turning him into a piece of kitschy pop art in the plaza next to the upscale restaurant Casa Lever. Now bankers can enjoy his presence as they sip $20 cocktails at Casa Lever’s bar. No longer a source of embarrassment; Scabby is a mounted trophy.

The piece crafted at Polich Tallix has been on display at Lever House since 2012, but I don’t walk that side of Park Avenue very frequently.

Filed under unions art public art lever house casa lever nyc park avenue manhattan sculpture