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Posts tagged manhattan

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Co-opting Protest as Pop Art
"Scabby The Rat" has been used for 25 years to protest companies that use non-union labor at construction sites and businesses.  The appearance of the towering inflatable eyesore was supposed to be a burr under contractors’ saddles, embarrassing them in the public eye.
The folks at Lever House on Park Avenue have completely co-opted the imagery of “Scabby”, however, by turning him into a piece of kitschy pop art in the plaza next to the upscale restaurant Casa Lever. Now bankers can enjoy his presence as they sip $20 cocktails at Casa Lever’s bar. No longer a source of embarrassment; Scabby is a mounted trophy.
The piece crafted at Polich Tallix has been on display at Lever House since 2012, but I don’t walk that side of Park Avenue very frequently.

Co-opting Protest as Pop Art

"Scabby The Rat" has been used for 25 years to protest companies that use non-union labor at construction sites and businesses.  The appearance of the towering inflatable eyesore was supposed to be a burr under contractors’ saddles, embarrassing them in the public eye.

The folks at Lever House on Park Avenue have completely co-opted the imagery of “Scabby”, however, by turning him into a piece of kitschy pop art in the plaza next to the upscale restaurant Casa Lever. Now bankers can enjoy his presence as they sip $20 cocktails at Casa Lever’s bar. No longer a source of embarrassment; Scabby is a mounted trophy.

The piece crafted at Polich Tallix has been on display at Lever House since 2012, but I don’t walk that side of Park Avenue very frequently.

Filed under unions art public art lever house casa lever nyc park avenue manhattan sculpture

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Rainy night in Lincoln Center

Filed under slomo nyc lincolncenter manhattan video fountains

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Modern Architecture in Historic Spaces
Architectural historian Gail Cornell gave an entertaining lecture last night about the the ten hottest modern architecture projects of 2013-2014. Modern architecture was an interesting subject to discuss inside the beautifully renovated Eldridge Street Synagogue in Chinatown, where people have worshiped for almost 150 years. 
I won’t steal Cornell’s lecture-thunder by listing the ten projects she ranked as the currently most buzzworthy in NYC, but some examples are The Mercedes House on W53rd (Enrique Norton & TEN Arquitectos), The LeFrak Lakeside  Center at Prospect Park (Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects), and The New School University Center at 14th St. and Fifth Ave. (SOM).
Good times. Thanks to OHNY for sponsoring the lecture.

Modern Architecture in Historic Spaces

Architectural historian Gail Cornell gave an entertaining lecture last night about the the ten hottest modern architecture projects of 2013-2014. Modern architecture was an interesting subject to discuss inside the beautifully renovated Eldridge Street Synagogue in Chinatown, where people have worshiped for almost 150 years. 

I won’t steal Cornell’s lecture-thunder by listing the ten projects she ranked as the currently most buzzworthy in NYC, but some examples are The Mercedes House on W53rd (Enrique Norton & TEN Arquitectos), The LeFrak Lakeside  Center at Prospect Park (Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects), and The New School University Center at 14th St. and Fifth Ave. (SOM).

Good times. Thanks to OHNY for sponsoring the lecture.

Filed under architecture modern modern architecture nyc manhattan synagogue historic renovation eldridge

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City of Compromise - 19th C. to 21st C. (by thelexiphane)
The facade of a 19th C. carriage house now stands as a genteel portal to a glass box on East 22nd Street. The carriage house at East 22nd was built in 1893 by S.V. Stratton, who put a fair amount of style into the building—note the array of voussoirs over the main doorway, flanked by two oculus windows. The second story features a trio of heavily blocked windows beneath an elliptical arch and stepped gables.
At some point in the last 10 years, a developer took out the carriage house, but left the original building’s facade as a street level washcloth, behind which the otherwise naked new glass facade could preserve some of its modesty.
Critics could savage this as Potemkin preservationism, but I think it’s a nice compromise. Note how the trio of windows on the carriage house facade now form a loggia for the setback glass tower. And the new tower provides some roofline continuity with the rest of the block’s 20th C. apartment buildings. This strikes me as eminently reasonable, and I have seen considerably worse.

City of Compromise - 19th C. to 21st C. (by thelexiphane)

The facade of a 19th C. carriage house now stands as a genteel portal to a glass box on East 22nd Street. The carriage house at East 22nd was built in 1893 by S.V. Stratton, who put a fair amount of style into the building—note the array of voussoirs over the main doorway, flanked by two oculus windows. The second story features a trio of heavily blocked windows beneath an elliptical arch and stepped gables.

At some point in the last 10 years, a developer took out the carriage house, but left the original building’s facade as a street level washcloth, behind which the otherwise naked new glass facade could preserve some of its modesty.

Critics could savage this as Potemkin preservationism, but I think it’s a nice compromise. Note how the trio of windows on the carriage house facade now form a loggia for the setback glass tower. And the new tower provides some roofline continuity with the rest of the block’s 20th C. apartment buildings. This strikes me as eminently reasonable, and I have seen considerably worse.

Filed under architecture nyc gramercy manhattan carriage house preservation historic modern 150 East 22nd St.